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Inspect workloads

When working with multiple containers running on a big cluster it's important to know what's where and how it performs. Monk provides simple but effective tools for inspecting and troubleshooting your workloads.


What's running right now?

monk ps

The ps command will show you all containers currently running in your cluster at any time.

How does my workload look like?

monk describe some/template

This will show a summary about a running workload, just like monk run would, but without re-running it.

What was running?

monk ps --all
monk ps -a

The ps command with --all (-a for short) will list all containers, even the ones that were running but are currently not.

How do I get logs?

monk logs some/runnable
monk logs -c <container-id> some/runnable

The logs command will show you the logs from any container, even the ones that are stopped. It's perfectly fine to just pass the runnable - monk will prompt show you a select if it detects more than one container.

Streaming logs

monk logs --follow some/runnable
monk logs --follow -c <container-id> some/runnable

Use the --follow (or -f) option to stay get a continuous stream of logs from a running container.

How do I get shell access?

monk shell some/runnable
monk shell -c <container-id> some/runnable

The shell command opens an interactive shell to any running container. It's perfectly fine to just pass the runnable - monk will prompt show you a select if it detects more than one container.

Use exit command in the shell to end the session.

How do I get performance stats?

monk stats

Will show the current CPU, memory, and disk usage of all containers running in the cluster.

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